A full-service construction company – specializing in residential & commercial renovations and custom design /build.

“Best Overall Kitchen Design”

Roanoke Valley Home Magazine, Patricia Held, Summer 2013

“Renovated and Right-Sized to Perfection”

Roanoke Valley Home Magazine, Patricia Held, Spring 2013

“Expert Advice”

By Sarah Cox: The Roanoke Times, Home & Garden 2007

“Matt Prescott, owner of a construction company, shares his tips on how a homeowner can ease the remodeling process”

“New Life for a Classic Beauty”

By Norma Lugar: The Roanoker MagazineDecmber 2005

It’s one of the city’s most breathtaking homes. A place Russ Ellis had admired since
he was a kid. Then, after selling his InSystems Technologies, he and wife Kelly were ready for their dream home: this gorgeous South Roanoke landmark. Today the house is theirs. Redone. Imprinted with their own personalities. And suited to a dynamic young family.

 

Assisted by interior designer Elaine Stephenson and renovation/ restoration expert Matt Prescott of Prescott Construction, she went to work. Both were valuable assets and, according to Russ, Prescott’s great value was that he “understood how to restore the house” with such architecturally unique features as an arched marble doorway, 24-inch exterior walls, 18-inch interior walls and massive glazed terra cotta tile roof.

“Downtown Living”

The Roanoke Times, Duncan Adams, October 19, 2003:

“Historic tax credits and other incentives have played a key role in most rehabilitation projects providing residential quarters in older, eligible buildings downtown. ‘They’re absolutely essential,’ said Matt Prescott, owner and president of Prescott Construction Co., whose company has tackled several such rehabs downtown.

“Prescott Construction worked with architect Peter Clapsaddle and Perdue Cabinets to create the home of Marilyn and Sands Woody at 315 Market St. And Prescott worked with architect Mark McConnel to renovate space above Angler’s Café into a loft apartment for Claus Kroeger and Debbie Sinex, who own the building at the corner of Kirk Avenue and Second Street. Both homes are on the downtown living tour.”

“Downtown—This is Living! Look Up!

Living quarters abound in downtown Roanoke”

Fran Ferguson, The Roanoker, September-October 2003:

"The home of Debbie Sinex and Claus Kroeger, 137 Kirk Avenue, SW: Debbie Sinex has made a living renovating old buildings…she found a small building on the corner of Kirk and Second Street… the roof was leaking and the building ‘needed so much work’

“With the help of Mark McConnel, architect, and Prescott Construction, she now has a wide-open 1,500-square-foot loft apartment and office space….”

“The home of Marilyn and Sands Woody, 315 Market Street, SE. The space is actually four smaller buildings knitted together, the oldest dating from the late 1890s. The renovation by Prescott Construction took more than a year, with the resulting space now housing the new Beamer’s restaurant on the ground floor, offices on the second, and the Woody’s 2,200-square-foot apartment on top.

“Profile: Builder puts his business where his heart is”

Rachel Cannon, Blue Ridge Business Journal, March 10, 2003:

“Keeping the old new is one of the goals of builder Matt Prescott, a guy whose background includes a fine arts degree and an English degree.”

“A Sophisticate Comes to Market”

2002 Kitchen, Bath and Remodeling Show, Salem, Va

“The owners: Sands and Marilyn Woody. The Home: 315 Market Street, a third-floor apartment situated above a four-building renovation called Market Station. The Builder: Matt Prescott of Prescott Construction Co. The Problem: Creating luxury quarters with extensive security from an again commercial building for owners’ use during periodic stays in the valley. The Outcome: A lovely residence with a New York-style presence inside a charming exterior of newly-cleaned brick, painted trim and restored cornices.”

Roanoke Valley Preservation Foundation, 2002 Preservation Awards

Roanoke Times, May 15, 2002

“The recipients are chosen for creativity in reuse, extensive preservation efforts,
long-standing stewardship or service and commitment to the community.

“Market Station/Trompeter Buildings—at Market Street and Church Avenue in downtown Roanoke, recognized for commercial restoration. Built around 1907, the former home to Trompeter Bakery was renovated to house The Daily Grind, The Great 711 Steak Company and office Space.”

“Rehabilitation-Commercial Market Station/Trompeter Building Mr. and
Mrs. O. Sands Woody.”

The Transformation of an Italian Beauty

Norma Lugar, The Roanoker, March/April 2001:

“It is easy to understand why Ann and David Trinkle fell in love with Casa Mia, the magnificent Northern Italian villa set on a two-acre site above Chestnut Ridge in South Roanoke.

“As new owners, we wanted to keep the uniqueness and the authentic architecture but update the house for today’s living and a young family. That’s why we chose Prescott Construction Company. They’re very good at making things work without changing the look of the structure.’

“Matt Prescott…had appreciation and his own assessment of the home and how to accomplish the transformation…’our objective was to completely update and renovate the house to suit a young family, give them to more contemporary amenities for the 21st century while incorporating all the new technology into an old house, still keeping its historic integrity.’”

15th Annual Small Business Awards
Roanoke Regional Chamber of Commerce, October 17, 2001

“Recognizing Outstanding Small Businesses: Prescott Construction Co., “Prescott Construction Co. began with one employee in 1995, today in employs six. A general contracting firm specializing in high quality residential, commercial, and historic restoration work. Concentrating on high quality construction, Prescott Construction works on many difficult and challenging restoration projects and produces impeccable results.“

As seen on TV... “Building Character”

An episode of HGTV featured Will Trinkle’s downtown Roanoke apartment and Prescott Construction as the the contractor for the project. Visit HGTV’s web site for the full story.

“Living in the glow of old-time radio.

The old WDBJ Radio building becomes a hip new home.”

The Roanoke Times, Mary Bishop, February 5, 1998

“Upstairs, Will Trinkle’s apartment rivals the hippest big-city digs—16-foot ceilings, original art deco lighting and a blend of luscious woods and stainless steel hardware that his designer playfully called ‘machine age/ocean liner.’

Will Trinkle hired Miami Beach designer Mark Gillin and local preservation-minded contractor Matt Prescott to bring it back.”

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